How MIPEX was used to reform Greek citizenship laws

MIPEX Greek partner – Miltos Pavlou of i-RED – explains how he used MIPEX to pass Greek citizenship reform.

  • How can civil society and academics use research to change policies?
  • How did international examples help Greece move from unfavourable citizenship policies to the EU Average?
  • How can you use MIPEX to ‘fact-check’ the public debate?
  • What lessons can be learned by other new immigration countries like Italy?

Watch this 3 minute video to find out:

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France: least favourable, most contradictory policies of major migration countries

Written by Thomas Huddleston, MIPEX Research Coordinator, Co-author and Policy Analyst, Migration Policy Group

Last week, I presented the MIPEX results for France, a country pushed in opposite directions. Overall, France scores 51 out of 100, which is 1 point below the EU average, and ranks 15th, which puts it behind Canada, Spain, the United States, Italy, Germany, the United Kingdom, even Denmark. Continue reading

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New anti-discrimination law in Spain and Poland to significantly affect MIPEX III results

Written by Uyen Do, Legal Policy Analyst, Migration Policy Group

Both Spain and Poland are expected to adopt new comprehensive legislation in 2011 to conform to the EC anti-discrimination directives. The introduction of these new provisions to comply with the requirements laid down in Directive 2000/43/EC (Racial Equality Directive) and Directive 2000/78/EC (Employment Equality Directive) will considerably improve the MIPEX results for Spain and Poland in the anti-discrimination area. Continue reading

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Sweden would get higher grades for enrolling pupils without papers, just like half its MIPEX peers

Written by Thomas Huddleston, MIPEX Research Coordinator, Co-author and Policy Analyst, Migration Policy Group

‘Historic’ agreement improves access and integration conditions in schools

Already at the head of the class on the MIPEX education strand, Sweden would excel further if the Swedish centre-right government and Green Party successfully open schools to all children living in the country. On 3 March, government announced a ‘historic’ cross-party agreement. According to TheLocal.se, the deal is intended to diminish the power of the anti-immigrant Swedish Democrats and make a clear choice about the future direction of Swedish policy; “We’re going to continue on the road toward humanity and order, this is a choice which closes the door on xenophobic forces,” stated Prime Minister Fredrik Reinfeldt. Indeed, days earlier, Prime Minister Reinfeldt reflected that “Sweden has a long way to go” when he responded to the widely-reported fact that Sweden again topped the MIPEX ranking. Continue reading

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Veni, Vidi, Naturalizzati?

Written by Thomas Huddleston, MIPEX Research Coordinator, Co-author and Policy Analyst, Migration Policy Group

Following European trends, Sarubbi-Granata Bill would moderately reform citizenship for immigrants and especially their children

This Thursday, I am attending the MIPEX event in Rome, organised by the British Council and Fondazione ISMU. I will put Italian policies into their European context for our discussion on “Italian Citizenship: an out-of-date legislation?” The MIPEX III results reflect Italy’s 1992 Nationality Law as well as the 2009 Security Act, which shaved 2-points off the country’s MIPEX citizenship score. I used our “improve your score” tool to make an unofficial impact assessment of the proposed 2009 ‘Sarubbi-Granata’ Bill.
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No to ‘Earned citizenship’: UK Government wants new legislation, but what direction?

Written by Thomas Huddleston, MIPEX Research Coordinator, Co-author and Policy Analyst, Migration Policy Group

The cut-off date for MIPEX III research was 31 May 2010. On 5 November 2010, UK Home Secretary Theresa May announced the government’s intention not to implement ‘earned citizenship.’ The previous UK government made all the legislative changes necessary when Parliament passed the 2009 Borders, Citizenship and Immigration Act. The Home Secretary called the approach “too complicated, bureaucratic, and, in the end, ineffective.”  These points were raised by opposition parties during parliamentary debate (See Report by Immigration Law Practitioners’ Association).

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